Monday, September 21, 2009

Summer container arrangements

I attribute most of my plant interest to my Mom and my grandmother.  I spent time with both of them growing up, walking around the yard and watering plants while learning their names.  My mom has always had really nice pots of plants along the front walkway to the house and covering the front porch of the house where I grew up.

[caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="420" caption="The walkway to the front door of my parents' house is nicely shaded and always full of plant life."]The walkway to the front door of my parents house is nicely shaded.[/caption]

This year is no exception.

[caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="420" caption="Sweet potato vines"]Sweet potato vines[/caption]

The front yard is shaded pretty heavily by a large River Birch tree.  It makes for a great location to grow many different plants.  This year there are containers with sweet potato vines, asparagus ferns (my  mom's favorites), marigolds, elephant ears and other foliage plants.

[caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="420" caption="My mom's colorful combination of summer annuals"]My moms colorful combination of summer annuals[/caption]

I really like this combination for it's variety of textures and colors.  Job well done, Mom!

4 comments:

  1. Oh, my! If my plants hear that they made your site, they will be difficult to live with the rest of the season. Talk about getting the big head! :-)
    Just hate to see the cold temperatures arrive as winter is so dull....
    Thanks for featuring the "front yard guys."

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  2. I so wish I could grow those plants out of doors.

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  3. Lovely plant combinations! The entrance looks cozy and inviting. Moms always do the best job, don't they? I love asparagus fern, too. What does your Mom do with it in winter? I keep mine in a pot and take it inside.

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  4. Tatyana-
    My mom brings her Asparagus ferns into the house or the garage over the winter. They lose a lot of their needles, but come out in full force when they are put outside again in the spring.

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